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To help students go beyond traditional teaching approaches, the Institute is creating a catalog of free online classes and video series that offer students and faculty alternative views on economic problems.

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    1

    Monetary Macroeconomics

    Some years ago, in the aftermath of the “great financial crisis” (GFC) of the first decade of the twentieth century, Paul Krugman famously remarked that “most macroeconomics of the last thirty years was spectacularly useless at best and positively harmful at worst”. It is the premise of this set of lectures that it is possible to do better, much better.

    2

    After the Crisis

    Many thought the financial crash was a final blow to capitalsim. Why does it still reign supreme? Anatole Kaletsky outlines the shape of things to come.

    3

    Advanced Microeconomics for the Critical Mind

    | Oct 3–Dec 19, 2016

    This course aims to introduce graduate students to the “standard” basic methods and topics of microeconomics as taught at the Ph.D. level, while providing a very different teaching approach than is prevalent in introductory doctoral-level microeconomics courses. Typically, much effort is focused on mastering a large technical apparatus consisting of axioms, theorems, propositions, and corresponding proofs, often leaving students longing for an informed and critical understanding of the deeper significance of the methods and results.

    4

    Capitalism: Competition, Conflict and Crises

    The aim of the two-semester sequence is to explore a coherent alternative to neoclassical and post-Keynesian theory that does not rely in any way on concepts of utility maximization, rational choice, rational expectations, or perfect/imperfect competition.

    5

    Economics of Money & Banking: Part Two

    Introduction to a “money view” of economic activity for modern times, building on the intellectual traditions of British central banking and American institutionalism. Part Two explores connections with foreign exchange and capital markets.

    6

    Economics of Money & Banking: Part One

    Introduction to a “money view” of economic activity for modern times, building on the intellectual traditions of British central banking and American institutionalism. Part One explores the economics of payment systems and money markets.

    7

    Money & Banking: The I Theory of Money

    This lecture series “Money & Banking” is based on Brunnermeier and Sannikov’s research papers “The I Theory of Money” and “Redistributive Monetary Policy”