Blog

An open platform for new thinking, with recent articles from James Boyce, Peter Temin, Institute Staff, and Nina Shapiro.

Carbon Dividends: The Bipartisan Key to Climate Policy?

The practical question in Washington today is not whether regulations will go, but whether anything will replace them Read more

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Mass Incarceration’s Dangerous New Equilibrium

A new model probes why the US leads the world in jailing and imprisoning people, and what it will take to reverse course Read more

America is Regressing into a Developing Nation for Most People

A new book by economist Peter Temin finds that the U.S. is no longer one country, but dividing into two separate economic and political worlds Read more

The Moral Burden on Economists

In his 2017 presidential address to the National Economic Association, Professor Darrick Hamilton warned that treating economics as a morally neutral ‘science’, and the discipline’s limited attention to structural barriers and overemphasis individual agency, has resulted in bad economics, and bad policy particularly as it relates to racial disparity. Read more

Meaningful Work: A Radical Proposal

To mark International Women’s Day, Neva Goodwin argues that the crisis of income insecurity and longstanding gender inequality require a form of universal basic income that recognizes and rewards the value of household labor Read more

Experts on Trial: Introduction

Widespread criticism of elites and their ‘experts ’ raises questions about how economists should perceive their role, and what role societies should give them. We invited four scholars to start an online conversation by sharing their perspectives  Read more

Jayadev: TPP is Dead, but its Legacy Lives On

Institute scholar Arjun Jayadev argues that while TPP is dead, its damaging legacy on intellectual property rights is likely to shape future bilateral trade agreements Read more

The economist as an expert: a prince, a servant or a citizen?

In his contribution to our ongoing series “Experts on Trial”, Alessandro Roncaglia argues that viewing economists as princes or servants of power is inherently authoritarian. We should instead see the economist as a socially and politically engaged citizen Read more

America’s Failures of Representation and Prospects for Democracy

A concentration of wealth and power that created a twin crisis of representation — in politics, and in expertise — set the stage for Donald Trump’s election victory, and has put America’s founding principles at risk Read more