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Julie A. Nelson is a professor of economics and department chair at the University of Massachusetts-Boston and a senior research fellow at the Global Development and Environment Institute at Tufts University. Dr. Nelson’s research areas include feminist economics, ecological economics, the philosophy and methodology of economics, ethics and economics, and the teaching of economics. She is author of Economics for Humans (2006), Feminism, Objectivity, and Economics (1996), and other books; coauthor of Microeconomics in Context (2008), Macroeconomics in Context (2008), and Introducing Economics: A Critical Guide for Teaching (2008); and coeditor of Beyond Economic Man (1993) and Feminist Economics Today (2003). She is also the author of many articles in journals including Econometrica, American Economic Review, Journal of Economic Perspectives, Ecological Economics, Economics and Philosophy, History of Political Economy, and Hypatia: Journal of Feminist Philosophy. Dr. Nelson received her Ph.D. degree in economics from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1986. She was a founding board member of the International Association for Feminist Economics, is an associate editor of the journal Feminist Economics, and is a member of the E3 Network, which stands for Economics for Equity and The Environment.

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Poisoning the Well, or How Economic Theory Damages Moral Imagination

Paper Grantee paper | | Oct 2012

Contemporary mainstream economics has widely “poisoned the well” from which people get their ideas about the relationship between economics and ethics.

Are Women Really More Risk-Averse than Men?

Paper Grantee paper | | Sep 2012

While a substantial literature in economics and finance has concluded that women are more risk averse than men, this conclusion merits reconsideration.

Is Dismissing the Precautionary Principle the Manly Thing to Do? Gender and the Economics of Climate Change

Paper Grantee paper | | Sep 2012

Many public debates about climate change now focus on the economic “costs” of taking action.

Would Women Leaders Have Prevented the Global Financial Crisis? Implications for Teaching about Gender, Behavior, and Economics

Paper Grantee paper | | Sep 2012

Would having more women in leadership have prevented the financial crisis?

Featuring this expert

Feelings Offstage

Article | Apr 15, 2012

INET Berlin 2012 - back home again. On stage, it’s been a huge amount of claims, assertions, and arguments about what went wrong, about what exactly happened, about why this time was different, about what will certainly happen, and about what remains deeply uncertain, about what “we” shall do about it, about what “we” could do better.