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Perry G. Mehrling

Involvement

Perry G. Mehrling, Professor of Economics, joined the faculty of Barnard College in 1987, where he teaches courses on the economics of money and banking, the history of money and finance, and the financial dimensions of the U.S. retirement, health, and education systems. His most recent book is The New Lombard Street: How the Fed became the dealer of last resort (Princeton 2011). His best-known book Fischer Black and the Revolutionary Idea of Finance (Wiley 2005, 2012) has recently been released in a revised paperback edition. Currently, Prof. Mehrling directs the educational initiatives of the Institute for New Economic Thinking, one of which is his course Economics of Money and Banking, available on Coursera at www.coursera.org/course/money.


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Economics of Money & Banking: Part One

Course

Introduction to a “money view” of economic activity for modern times, building on the intellectual traditions of British central banking and American institutionalism. Part One explores the economics of payment systems and money markets.

Young Scholars Will Bring New Economic Thinking

Article | Apr 23, 2013

So why am I hopeful about the future?

OMT: Slouching toward Eurobills?

Article | Oct 30, 2012

The Eurocrisis has many dimensions—bank solvency crisis, sovereign debt crisis, political unity crisis, and economic/unemployment crisis—but time after time it has been the liquidity crisis dimension driving events, and ECB response to the liquidity crisis driving institutional evolution. The reason is simple. Liquidity kills you quick.

Ring-fencing Explained

Article | Oct 2, 2012

Everyone wants to ring-fence something, but they can’t agree on what:

Featuring this expert

Azim Premji Winter School 2013

Event Workshop | Jan 6–17, 2013

The Azim Premji University-Institute for Economic Thinking Advanced Graduate Workshop in Poverty, Development and Globalization is interested in identifying the complex global interactions that influence poverty and development as well as the development strategies that have proven successful in promoting equitable growth, promoting capabilities, and reducing poverty.

The Survival of the Riskiest

Video | Jan 2, 2013

Financial fragility does not fall from the sky. That’s why treating risk as if it comes from exogenous shocks can’t capture the reality of financial markets.

Human Capital in the Industrial Revolution

Video | Nov 13, 2012

Did the industrial revolution increase the relative demand for skilled labor, or decrease it?

How Expectations Interact to Create Bubbles

Video | Nov 5, 2012

How do economists make their models work? By assuming that investors have rational expectations and that every market participant is alike. However, things quickly get messy once economists start to acknowledge that people are different, interact with each other, and change heuristic forecasting strategies based on recent performance.